Online Advertising Basics: What is Google AdWords?

Online Advertising Basics: What is Google AdWords?

Familiar with online marketing? Does it help you and your website increase sales? Recently, most companies switch to online advertising because it saves more money, time, as well as reduces effort. When defining online advertising, it is a form of marketing strategy with the use of Internet to deliver promotional marketing messages to consumers. Thanks to Google that it provides its own advertising application, which is the Google AdWords.

 

 

Google AdWords is an online advertising service where advertisers pay to display brief advertising copy, products and video to web users. Google AdWords’ system is based partly on cookies and partly on keywords determined by advertisers. Google uses these characteristics to place advertising copy on pages where they think it might be relevant. Advertisers pay when users divert their browsing to click on the advertising copy. Partner websites receive a portion of the generated income.

The AdWords program includes local, national, and international distribution. Google’s text advertisements are short, consisting of one headline with a maximum of 30 characters, two text lines of 35 characters each, and a display URL of 40 characters. These mimic what the average search result looks like on Google. Image ads can be one of the several different standardized sizes as designated by the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB). In May 2016, Google announced its reformatting of ads to help consumers and advertisers succeed in a mobile-first world. The new format, called Expanded Text Ads, allows for 23% more text. This new format is available on both the Google Search Network and the Google Display network. It features two headlines with 30 characters each, replacing the standard of a single headline with 30 characters. The display URL has been replaced with two 15 character paths, not including the root domain.

Features

IP address exclusion

In addition to controlling ad placements through targeting audiences based on location and language usage, ad placements can be refined with Internet Protocol (IP) address exclusion. This feature enables advertisers to exclude specified IP address ranges if they do not want their ads to appear there. Advertisers can exclude up to 500 IP addresses per campaign.

 

AdWords Express

Google AdWords Express is a feature aimed at small businesses as it reduces the difficulty of managing ad campaigns by automatically managing keywords and ad placement. AdWords Express was previously known as Google Boost.

AdWords Express also supports small businesses that do not have a website, allowing them to direct customers to their place page.

 

Google Partners

Google Partners, originally known as Google AdWords Certification Program or Google AdWords Certification, is a Google AdWords partner certification program. To become AdWords certified, clients need to pass the AdWords Fundamentals exam and one of the other Advanced AdWords exams such as Search Advertising, Display Advertising, Video Advertising, Shopping Advertising, and Mobile Advertising.

It replaced Google Advertising Professionals in April 2010, with updates ranging from amended criteria for entries and changes to the exam requirements. The program continues to certify consultants to help the increasing number of Google AdWords clients with AdWords campaigns.[13] The program contains one fundamental exam and five advanced exams.

In order to be individually qualified, a person must pass the program exams. The AdWords qualifications received vary based on which advance exams the individual passes. Google Partners must continue with their best practices by engaging with ongoing professional development. One accredited individual must be certified (two individuals for Google Premier Partners) and a minimum spend threshold of US$10,000 over 90 days must be maintained, with a higher spend threshold for Google Premier Partners.

 

Placement-targeted advertisements (formerly Site-Targeted Advertisements)

In 2003 Google introduced site-targeted advertising. Using the AdWords control panel, advertisers can enter keywords, domain names, topics, and demographic targeting preferences. Based on this, Google places ads on relevant sites within the content network. If domain names are targeted, Google also provides a list of related sites for placement. Advertisers bid on a cost-per-impression (CPI) or cost-per-click (CPC) basis for site targeting.

With placement targeting, it is possible for an ad to take up an entire ad block instead of splitting the ad into two to four ads. This leads to higher ad visibility for the advertiser.

The minimum cost-per-thousand impressions bid for placement-targeted campaigns is 25 cents. There is no minimum CPC bid.

 

Re-marketing

Remarketing is an AdWords feature that allows marketers to show advertisements to those that have already been to their website. This feature also allows marketers to create different audiences from website users and to show relevant ads to separate audiences. Re-marketing Lists for Search (RLSA) via Google Analytics became available in Google AdWords in early June 2015, allowing standard GA re-marketing lists to be used to plan traditional text search ads.

A more advanced subtype of remarketing is dynamic remarketing through which advertisers can show past visitors the specific products or services they viewed to further customize the experience and enhance conversion rates. This subtype is especially used by e-commerce websites that foster a diverse range of products and services and need to have their remarketing messages relevant to users.

While remarketing is a mainstream practice, it remains to be perceived as an intrusive one to many users as they might feel annoyingly stalked all over the internet. So, it is recommended for AdWords advertisers to dive deep into optimization practices such as frequency capping so that their remarketing efforts won’t backfire and build customer dissatisfaction and distress instead of brand awareness and sales.

 

Ad Extensions

Ad extensions allow advertisers to show extra information with their ads, such as a business address, phone number, or web page links. Ad extensions are created to improve ad visibility and attract clicks. They appear with the Search Network, above search results, and at time on the Display Network.

AdWords shows extensions when it calculates that the extensions will improve the advertiser’s campaign performance, or when an ad is ranked high enough for it to appear.

 

Google Click-to-Call

Google Click-to-Call was a service provided by Google which allowed users to call advertisers straight from Google search results pages. Users entered their phone numbers and Google would connect the call to the advertiser. Google paid for the calling charges. The service was discontinued in 2007. For some time, similar click-to-call functionality was available for results in Google Maps. In the Froyo release of Google’s Android operating system, certain advertisements included a very similar functionality. In iOS, phone numbers are automatically recognized as such. Web developers can also provide direct links to the Phone application, providing similar functionality.

Google now offers a mobile click-to-call function which allows searchers to call a business directly rather than going to their website.

 

Source: https://adwords.google.com/home/

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